Vaccine To Protect Adolescent Girls From Cervical Cancer

Vaccine To Protect Adolescent Girls From Cervical Cancer

If one wants to remain protected from cervical cancer then researchers have recommended them to have GlaxoSmithKline PLC's (GSK) anti-human papillomavirus vaccine. It gives more protection, if parents get their girls vaccinated before she gets sexually active.

The Lancet Oncology published report has been included in the European Commission report of 2011. One of the lead authors, Matti Lehtinen from University of Tampere in Finland, was of the view that the first job of the vaccine is to protect adolescent girl from common HPV cancer types.

Cervical cancer is the third most dangerous cancer in the world and vaccine targets HPV16/18, which otherwise is the reason of 85% of cervical cancer. Matti suggested that it is best to couple the vaccination with continuous screening programmes.

Two main targets of this vaccine are HPV types 16 and 18 and with this it has become the first vaccine, which has targeted on these two types, which accounts for 70% of the cervical cancer cases. Generally, vaccine programmes tends to focus on cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 (CIN2).

In order to reach at above conclusion, 20,000 healthy women were enrolled from 14 different countries across the globe. Some of the countries were Asia-Pacific, Europe, Latin America, and North America. Women average age was between 15 and 25.

These women were divided in two parts through random selection. Half of the women were asked to take vaccine program and others were asked to take hepatitis A vaccine as control group. After four years of follow up, it was found that the efficacy level of the vaccine is quite high.

Authors affirmed, ‘Appropriate effectiveness and implementation studies assessing the combination of vaccination and new screening strategies are warranted’. Increased coverage is needed so women, who are not yet sexually active, remain protected at the time when their reach at their puberty level.


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