U.S. museum hosting the country’s biggest exhibition on pterosaurs

U.S. museum hosting the country’s biggest exhibition on pterosaurs

The American Museum of Natural History is hosting an exhibition on Pterosaurs, which will shed more light on facts about prehistoric flying reptiles.

Titled 'Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs,' the exhibition will also provide visitors with a rare opportunity to 'pilot' two species of the prehistoric flying reptiles over prehistoric landscapes.

Speaking about the ongoing exhibition, American Museum of Natural History President Ellen Futter said, "Despite persistently captivating our popular imagination, pterosaurs is among the least well understood large animals from the age of dinosaurs."

Pterosaurs are considered to be the most outstanding fliers of all times. In size, they spanned from little flappers like a bat to huge species, which had wings spanning 33 feet. Some of them were as tall as today's giraffe.

Naturalists had no knowledge about pterosaurs until the late 18th century, when someone accidently discovered the skeleton of a pterosaur buried in a layer of 150 million-year-old limestone in Germany.

Researchers later discovered that pterosaurs flourished through the Mesozoic, and left behind their bones in rocks dating to 228 million to 66 million years ago, a time when the planet was populated by dinosaurs.

Though pterosaurs were related to dinosaurs, but they were not dinosaurs. They had their own evolutionary line.

The exhibition kicked off on Saturday and will run till January next year.


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